Sunday, December 25, 2016

Wednesday, October 26, 2016

The Essential Guide to Caring for an Old Dog

How do you know when to consider your dog as a senior?

Is it when they turn a certain age? Or is it when their hair starts going a little grey?

To answer the question, it really just depends.


In general, bigger dog breeds will age and show signs of ageing faster than smaller breed dogs. 

For example, a Great Dane is considered to be a senior by roughly 5-6 years old, a Golden Retriever could be considered senior by 8-10 years, and small dogs like a Chihuahua are considered a senior around the age of 10-11.

Aside from age, dogs can also show a number of signs that they are ageing. These may include:
  • Decrease in energy levels
  • Arthritis and stiffening of joints
  • Not jumping up or down surfaces like they use to e.g. the couch, stairs etc.
  • Rougher and thinner coat with bald patches and white hairs
  • Deafness, revealed by failure to respond to commands
  • Tooth and gum conditions
  • Warts, fatty lumps and even tumours may appear (ensure to check these with your vet)
  • Excessive thirst and frequent and uncontrolled urination
  • Confusion or failure to recognise surroundings
  • Decreased appetite
  • Depression, disobedience and occasional destructive behaviour
  • A hazy, bluish cast over the eyes (should not affect eyesight unless cataracts are formed)
  • A tendency to sleep more during the day but sleep less at night. Some dogs may pace around the house at night due to sore joints, senility or even loneliness
  • Weight gain

Although you don’t want it to, the day will come when you start spotting the signs of your dog ageing. However this does not mean you have to wrap your fur-friend in cotton wool and start to worry.

You may just need to make a few small adjustments to your usual routine, and take a few extra precautions. To help you out, we’ve gathered the top 7 most important things you should be doing to care for an old dog.

1. Proper Medical Care


Regular check-ups are very important for older dogs. 

Keep note of any new or unusual symptoms your dog may be showing and report them to your vet.

It's also crucial that you maintain your dog’s regular flea & tick, heartworm and worm protection, as older dogs can be more susceptible to disease.

And if your dog has been diagnosed with a certain medical condition, for example Arthritis, you really want to stay on top of their medication schedule, to ensure your fur-friend is happy and comfortable as can be.



2. Steady Exercise


Obesity and arthritis are the top two most common problems experienced by older dogs, so regular exercise is very important.

Even a brisk walk around the block, or play time in the backyard is great for keeping their joints moving.

Please note, if your dog has been diagnosed with arthritis, consult your vet before beginning an exercise routine. 



3. Daily Routine


A consistent and daily routine is something everyone can benefit from, and will help your dog’s physical, mental and emotional health.

Even if it’s as simple as feeding at the same time, regular afternoon walks, grooming at night etc.

Things for them to look forward to in a sense.



4. Healthy Skin & Coat


Ensuring a regular skin and coat routine for your older dog is not only going to help their external appearance, but it’s going to make them feel great on the inside too.

Try bathing your older dog every 2-3 weeks with a soothing shampoo such as Aloveen Oatmeal Shampoo, as this will be gentle on their skin and leave their fur smelling great and feeling silky smooth. 

And for a little extra support, a supplement such as PAW Coat, Skin & Nail Chews that contains the essential nutrients silica and zinc, along with chia and flaxseeds, will really help improve and maintain your dog’s appearance. 



5. Healthy Teeth & Gums


Older dogs are more prone to gum disease and tartar build-up, so a regular dental routine is very important. 

Dental treats are a simple and low-cost solution to keep your dog’s pearly whites shinning bright.

A product such as Greenies Dental Treats will provide your dog with complete oral care when fed daily. Plus, the treats will help discourage tartar build up and plaque, and are also a great solution for freshening your dog’s breath. 



6. Emotional Support


As your dog ages, it’s important to be sensitive to what they are going through, and understand that a lot of psychological changes are taking place. 

Daily care for your older pet may require a little more patience on your part. 

Your loving care and commitment will really help and make for a positive quality of life for your senior fur-friend.



7. Specific Nutrition


Understanding the changing nutritional needs of your senior dogs is one of the most important things for you to consider. 

Generally, dogs of seven years and older will start to take life a little easier, and as a result, their nutritional needs and requirements will need to adjust to this new way of life.

Senior dogs are less active and have a slower metabolism, so fewer calories are required.

This does not mean lesser quality, as easy-to-digest protein and nutrients now become more important than ever. 

The simplest way to ensure you are providing your dog with everything they need to thrive, is to feed them with specifically formulated senior diet dog food.



Overall, caring for your older dog is just like caring for any aged dog. Snuggle up, spend quality time together, and appreciate every moment you pup has to give. 

Do you have any tips for providing extra care for your older dog? Let us know on our Facebook page or in the comments. 

Why Talking to Your Pet is Good for Your Health

Hands up if you talk to your pet?

And if you’re anything like us at CanadaVet, it’s each and every day, all day long.

We love telling them about our day, what we’ve been up to, and even how we feel.

Whilst this may sound a little strange to those without pets, talking to pets is actually very common.

But did you know talking to your pet is good for your health?



“The average dog can understand around 200 words”



Your Pet Knows How You’re Feeling


Here’s a fun fact, although we talk to people using words, 80% of our communication is actually via our body language. 

The average dog can understand up to 200 words, but won’t really understand spoken language.

They can however, pick up on our emotions, and are able to sense how we’re feeling. 

Kind of like a 6th sense.

Some dogs will lay their head on your lap when you’re upset for example, whilst your cat may often sit with you when you’re feeling lonely or unwell (even if they don’t sit with you normally).

So it doesn’t really matter what you say to them, but rather how you express it.

If you’re one to talk regularly to your pet, he or she is going to know you inside out, which is a really special bond to have with your fur friend.



“Your pet senses how much you love them by the way you talk to them”


Talking to Your Pet Is Good for BOTH of You


We see pets as family, and genuine friends that we can bare our souls to – secrets are always safe, and an animal will never judge us… or do they?

But did you know having a good old yarn with your fur friend is actually good for your mental health?

Taking to pet’s and interacting with them regularly can lower stress levels, increase productiveness and overall just make you feel good!

That’s why at CanadaVet, we bring our furry pals to work with us. For more information, click here.

Now as mentioned earlier, pets can sense how your feeling; and they can also sense how you feel towards them.

A lot of you and your pet’s communication is actually expressed through intonation.

For example, your dog may associate a high, happy voice with positivity and excitement, a neutral, calming voice with reassurance, and a low, deep voice with negativity or disapproval.

Next time you talk to your pet, think about your tone and body language and see how they respond.



“Your pet actually has a lot to say in return”


You Learn Your Pet’s Language Too


Although animals are good at picking up on much of what we say, they still have their own way of communication too.

Start paying greater attention, and you’ll notice that your pet has quite a lot to say in return when you talk to them.

Try immerse yourself in the body language of your cat, dog, bunny or any pet for that matter, and you’ll soon realise there’s a whole new form of communication to discover.

Overall, the more you work on understanding each other, the stronger your bond will be and the happier and healthy you both will feel!




Do you know how to break up a dog fight? Learn the skills and protect your pet here.

Wednesday, October 12, 2016

How To Take a Photo of Your Pet In 5 Simple Steps

Can we all agree we’ve tried to take that perfect picture of our pet to share across social media, however failed miserably?

Fido sit, stay, don’t move ah! 

Taking a good photo of your cat or dog can be tricky; as most pets are not natural born posers… 

Not to worry, let us help you capture that Kodak moment with our 5-step guide to taking the perfect picture of your pet.

Step One: Work with Your Pet’s Personality


Some dogs are gentle, slow moving and calm; while others jump, lick and run laps of the yard. 

Consider what makes your pet unique and work on these qualities. 

For example, photograph your playful pooch during a game of fetch, or your cat that enjoys snoozing for hours, on a cosy blanket next to the fireplace. 

And try avoid encouraging your pet into unnatural situations; as showing their true personality always looks best.



Step Two: Ensure a Relaxed Atmosphere


Getting your pet to pose in a studio is not only difficult, but they probably won’t enjoy it either. 

In fact, most pets are more likely to relax and be their best selves in a familiar environment; at home, in the garden, or even the beach. 

Try make your little photo shoot fun for everyone, and ensure there is plenty of interaction and breaks. 



Step Three: Natural Lighting Works Best


For the most desirable lighting, try photographing your pet during the day and preferably outside. 

Also avoid using a flash, as this will not look as effective and can also frighten your pet. 

In additional to good lighting, you also want to consider the surroundings. 

An adventurous dog against the backdrop of a crystal clear beach makes for a pretty amazing shot.



Step Four: Get On Your Pet’s Level


Our best tip to you, is to get on your pet’s level. 

Kneeling down when photographing animals really does make a huge difference. 

Photos taken from a low camera angle will help make your pet the central focus in the final image.

Aim for the eyes and you’ll capture your pet’s unique personality. 

And if your pet is acting calm or a little sleepy, this is a great chance to get up close and personal. 

Most importantly, experiment! Try a close-up portrait or a fun action shot.

Another great tip is to take your photos with your subject off-centre, and have something interesting in the background.

Not only will this look nicely balanced, but your friends will think you’re a pro!



Step 5: The Winning Shot


Keep things simple, stay relaxed, and just have fun with it!

Encourage plenty of action with a selection of toys and treats, as this will allow for a range of different shots.

And most importantly, aim to harness your pet’s natural spontaneity and instinct. Your dog might suddenly do something funny, so be alert and ready to capture the moment. 

Overall, your little photoshoot most likely won’t turn out quite as you imagined, but you’ll soon see that this makes for some super cute photos, and some memorable moments shared with your best friend.

Happy snapping!



We’d love to see our tips put to use. Share your perfect pet photos on our Facebook page and you could be featured in monthly newsletter that is sent out to over 26,000 pet families!

Tuesday, August 30, 2016

The Best Way To Break Up A Dog Fight

As humans, breaking up a dog fight is something we hope to never have to do. Being a good pet owner, you may have the best behaved and trained pooch around, however not all dogs get along – even the good ones. Instinct is a very powerful thing in animals, so simply telling your dog to ‘stop’ or ‘come here’ nine times out of ten is not going to work. They no longer hear you as their loving loyal owner, but instead their only focus in that very moment is to attack – no matter who it might be at. 


It cannot be stressed enough that you should never, ever reach into the chaos and grab your dog away. This manoeuvre is rather going to leave you injured than breaking up the clash. Instead, there are a two effective techniques that will ensure everyone involved walks away serious-injury free. 

Technique 1: Two-person breakup

This technique will be effective if you have two people who are able to break the fight up together.
  1. At the same time each grab a dog’s back legs
  2. Raise them up, similar to how you would lift a wheelbarrow
  3. Back both dogs away slowly, continuing to hold their legs in the air (this will prevent them from reaching around and biting you)
  4. Once the dogs are safely separated, try hold them securely until they are calm and face them away from the other dog if possible


Technique 2: One-person breakup

This technique can be used if you are alone, however proceed with caution. 

  1. Grab a free leash or a piece of rope
  2. Slowly approach the more aggressive dog
  3. Once you are close enough, loop the leash around their middle section, you want to catch them just in front of their back legs
  4. Slip the free end of the leash through its looped handle and pull tight
  5. Once fastened, slowly pull the dog backward until you find something to fasten them to, such as a telephone pole or fence post
  6. Now shift your focus to the second dog and grab them from behind using the “wheelbarrow” technique described above
  7. Again, pull them away at least 5 metres and restrain until the dogs are calm or help arrives


Whether it’s big dogs or small dogs, these techniques will work the same. Try not to scream or yell unless it’s calling for help, and most importantly, be quick, stay mindfully aware, and remain calm and assertive.

Want the longest lasting flea and tick protection for your dog? Click here to learn more.

Tuesday, August 16, 2016

Buy One Get One FREE Frontline Original on CanadaVet

This month on CanadaVet.com we have Buy One Get One Free Frontline Orignial. That's a saving of up to $49! Protect your pet from fleas and ticks with Frontline Original today.


Monday, June 20, 2016

Take Your Dog to Work Day - June 24th 2016

Here at CanadaVet, every day is bring your pet to work day. However, did you know there is an annual day recognized worldwide for bringing your pet to work? How cool!

CanadaVet Staffy Staff Members

Take Your Dog to Work Day will take place this Friday the 24th of June 2016 in Canada and all around the world.

A little history on how this day all came about, it was first celebrated in 1996 in the United Kingdom and became popular in the United States in 1999. Take Your Dog to Work Day not only lets pet owners celebrate the bond and companionship they share with their pets, but also brings greater awareness to adopting from local shelters and rescue groups.

Studies have proved that bringing your dog, or cat to work can provide a number of physical and mental health benefits, increase activity and staff productiveness, and overall create a positive and fun work environment. 

To ensure your Take Your Dog to Work Day runs smoothly this Friday, learn our Top 5 Tips for Bringing Pets to Work.

Tip One: Training

Ensure your pet is suitably trained and well socialised before bringing into work. Set aside time during the day for toilet breaks, however it’s recommended to also provide training pads to avoid accidents. Use positive reinforcement when your pet shows good behaviour, including whenever they do the toilet in the correct place. This will help reduce the likelihood of your pet playing up or toileting in the wrong area.  

Tip Two: Comfort

Allow your pet some free time when you arrive in the morning. This will give them time to get to know their surroundings and say hello to other co-workers. Bring along your pet’s favourite blanket, bed, and toys to help them feel comfortable in the new environment. Keep these items by your desk to encourage your pet to stay by your side and avoid causing disruption to other workers. 

Tip Three: Environment

Consider if your workplace is a safe environment before bringing your pet in. Is there any hazardous machinery, substances or open flames? If so maybe your workplace is not suitable for bringing in your pet. Also be aware of security and if your pet could escape easily, and if so is there a busy road outside. Above all, your pet’s safety is what matters most. 

Tip Four: Cleaning

If you or other staff members are regularly bringing your pets to work, ensure the office is equip with relevant cleaning products, such as paper towels and disinfectant. If your pet does toilet in the office, it’s always best to display no reaction. Clean the area thoroughly to remove any scent, as this will reduce the likelihood of the pet doing it in that spot again.

Tip Five: Vaccinated

Before bringing your pet to work, it’s important to ensure their vaccinations are up to date and that they are free from any diseases or illnesses that could spread to other animals. Also consider the risk of any hidden parasites that may be residing at your workplace and administer protection accordingly. This will allow for a happy and healthy environment for all.

Click here for Five Fun Facts About Man's Best Friend.

Tuesday, June 14, 2016

Introducing Seresto - The Longest Lasting Protection From Fleas And Ticks


Seresto isn't like other flea collars. The innovative patented collar matrix in each easy to apply, non-greasy odour free collar, provides 8 months of effective protection against fleas (in cats and dogs) and 4 months protection against all ticks (in dogs only). 9/10 pet parents recommend Seresto as it's effective, fast and easy to use.


Seresto works for your pet:

Fleas don't have to bite to die. Seresto works through contact, killing fleas that can cause painful bites.

Protection against ticks (dogs only). Seresto kills and repels ticks.

Water resistant*. Bath time and swimming aren't off limits.

Seresto works for you:

Less hassle, no mess. Seresto is non-greasy and odor free and helps avoid the hassle of applying monthly topicals.

Easy-to-use. Application of collar is easy. The collar should be worn continuously for the full protection period.

Protection Plus. 8 months against fleas (cats and dogs), 4 months against ticks (dogs only).

Thursday, May 12, 2016

Five Places Pets Should Be More Welcome

Canada has one of the highest rates of pet ownership in the world. It is estimated that 57% of Canadian households own pets, that's over 13.8 million cats and dogs! Although people with pets account for over half the Canadian population, there are still many limitations pet owners face in their everyday lives. Here at CanadaVet, we believe pets are family and should be free to join us wherever we go, and in whatever we are doing. Have a read of our top five places we think pets should be more welcome.

1. Work

At CanadaVet HQ our pets are not only our friends, but our co-workers too. We love having our pets at work with us, and believe bringing pets to work improves staff productiveness, reduces stress levels and creates a positive and fun atmosphere for all.


2. All Homes

We understand that people with investment properties have to put a lot of trust in their tenants to take care of their homes. But should it be so difficult for families with pets to find a rental? As long as the home is cared for, and there are no hidden surprises left when inspections come around, why can't our four-legged friends be given a set of keys too?


3. Aeroplanes

It is known that some pets can travel in the cabin area with us on a number of well know airlines including, Air Canada, American Airlines and Delta to name a few. This practice is commonly seen within the country, however if you are travelling far outside the Canadian or U.S boarder, say bye bye for now to your fur friend as they will have to be placed below deck in the cargo hold. Cargo holds can be dark, noisy and they are not as strictly temperature and pressure regulated as the passenger cabin. Your pet is not under constant supervision and there just seems like a lot of opportunity for something to go wrong. Perhaps some more thought could go into creating practices and new regulations that allow pets to travel by our side no matter the distance or destination.  


4. The Beach and Parks

Although there are the few allocated dog beaches and dog friendly parks across the country, these locations are not necessarily convenient or close by for all pet owners to consistently travel to on their routine morning and afternoon walks. It is understood that pet owners face criticism for apparently never picking up their dog's mess or letting their dogs run riot. However, beaches and parks can be covered in everything from general trash and disposable nappies, to discarded food and broken glass bottles. Walking a dog is a time where people can relax, take a break from their busy lives, and bond with their fur friend. We believe this simple task shouldn't be restricted and people should have the freedom to walk their dog wherever they please!


5. Vacations

The more pet-friendly vacations are, the better! Most pets spend every day at home or in a familiar surrounding. And just like us pets probably get sick of seeing the same house/life at times too. Surprisingly, there are more and more hotels and holiday apartments that will allow pets. Many hotel comparison websites now have a 'pet friendly' option to select. Hooray! Now our fur friends can join in on the vacation fun too!


If you’d like to know more about pets in the workplace, learn our Top 5 Tips for Bring Pets to Work here.

Wednesday, May 4, 2016

15% off NexGard 6 Packs at CanadaVet!

Is your dog protected from fleas and ticks this spring? Visit CanadaVet.com to get 15% Off NexGard 6 packs


For access to more exclusive offers like this visit our website and sign up to our newsletter today!

Monday, April 11, 2016

20% off K9 Advantix, Advantage and Advocate (Advantage Multi) at CanadaVet

Receive 20% off K9 Advantix, Advantage and Advocate (Advantage Multi) at CanadaVet! Click here to shop this exclusive offer.


For more amazing deals on pet supplies visit CanadaVet.com.

Friday, April 8, 2016

Spectacular Surfing Dogs From Australia!

Now that's something you don't see everyday. Check out these spectacular surfing dogs all the way from the world renown, Noosa Festival of Surfing in Australia!


Click here for 5 Fun Facts About Man's Best Friend.


Wednesday, April 6, 2016

Top 5 Tips For Bringing Pets To Work


1. Training
Ensure your pet is suitably trained and well socialized before bringing into work. Set aside time during the day for toilet breaks, however it’s recommended to also provide training pads to avoid accidents. Use positive reinforcement when your pet shows good behaviour, including whenever they do the toilet in the correct place. This will help reduce the likelihood of your pet playing up or toileting in the wrong area.  

2. Comfort
Allow your pet some free time when you arrive in the morning. This will give them time to get to know their surroundings and say hello to other co-workers. Bring along your pet’s favourite blanket, bed and toys to help them feel comfortable in the new environment. Keep these items by your desk to encourage your pet to stay by your side and avoid causing disruption to other workers. 

3. Environment
Consider if your workplace is a safe environment before bringing your pet in. Is there any hazardous machinery, substances or open flames? If so maybe your workplace is not suitable for bringing in your pet. Also be aware of security and if your pet could escape easily, and if so is there a busy road outside. Above all, your pet’s safety is what matters most. 

4. Cleaning
If you or other staff members are regularly bringing your pets to work, ensure the office is equip with relevant cleaning products, such as paper towels and disinfectant. If your pet does toilet in the office, it’s always best to display no reaction. Clean the area thoroughly to remove any scent, as this will reduce the likelihood of the pet doing it in that spot again.

5. Vaccinated
Before bringing your pet to work, it’s important to ensure their vaccinations are up to date and that they are free from any diseases or illnesses that could spread to other animals. Also consider the risk of any hidden parasites that may be residing at your workplace and administer protection accordingly. This will allow for a happy and healthy environment for all.

Click here to find out the 8 hacks that will make every cat owners life easier.

Friday, March 25, 2016

8 Hacks That Will Make Every Cat Owners Life Easier

We think all cat owners can agree when we say our kitty friends can sometimes get themselves into some strange situations. Well look in fear no more as we reveal our Top 8 Hacks that will make every cat owners life easier.

1. If your cat would prefer to do their business in private, remove a cabinet door panel and add a curtain with a tension rod to hide a litter box inside.


2. To give indoor cats a little feel for the outdoors lifestyle, make a tiny bed of grass for your cat to sit on.


3. Cats enjoy high places so they can keep watch and look down on their surroundings. Create a cat stairway to heaven using Ikea Lack shelves.


4. Create a D.I.Y kitty exercise tower by cutting out squares in a bookshelf for your cat to climb through.


5. If you suspect your cat has fleas, in addition to administering an appropriate flea control, light a candle and it should trap any stray fleas.


6. If your cat eats too quickly and then throws up, place their food in a shallow plate. This will stop your cat from shovelling large amounts of food into their mouth, and encourage them to take smaller bites.


7. If you don't want your fur friend making home on your new couch, temporarily place double-sided tape on the areas your cat jumps. Cat's will not like the sticking feeling on their paw's, and as a result stay off the areas where the tape is placed.


8. It seems to be a 'cat' thing whenever we go to do some work in the office, our cats take the opportunity to come join us and place themselves in all the wrong places. On the keyboard, in front of the monitor, over your arm, the list goes on. Place a cardboard box of some sort (upside down board game boxes work great) on your desk. We guarantee your cat will make this new, oh so comfy place home and allow you to finally get some work done in peace.


Ever wondered why your cat chooses to run laps of the house at 3:00AM? Click here for more.

Monday, March 7, 2016

How To Get Your House To Not Smell Like Your Pets

We all love our animals, however pet ownership can come with some unique challenges. One in particular is keeping your home smelling clean and fresh – and not like a barnyard! Whether your pets may soil the house or have an extra stinky coat, there is a simple method you can take to reduce and even eliminate pet odor. 


Stock up on baking soda. A natural odor absorber, baking soda is man’s new best friend – for removing pet odors anyway! Not only can it be used as a natural air freshener (just leave an open box on the kitchen bench), it can also remove odors from fabrics, furniture and even inside litter boxes. 

For problem areas such as the couch or carpet, simply sprinkle a little fresh baking soda in an inconspicuous area of your furniture or room and then vacuum or wipe clean. For animal urine, soak up the damp area as soon as possible and then sprinkle baking soda over the area. Allow to dry and then pat area gently with a clean towel. Vacuum the remainder once the area has completely dried. Baking soda can also be added to litter trays. Simply sprinkle a layer of baking soda in the box before adding littler, and then add another layer on top of the littler. This should further help absorb and defuse any additional odor.  

Ever wondered how apple cider vinegar can help you dog? Read how here.

Wednesday, February 10, 2016

Understanding And Preventing Heartworm Disease

One of the most common, dangerous and yet easily prevented diseases that our beloved pets can catch is heartworm disease. Learn about heartworm disease, the symptoms and preventative treatments here; to keep your pets healthy and active all year round.


What Is Heartworm Disease?

Heartworms are parasitic worms that live in the heart and nearby blood vessels, causing decreased blood flow to the heart and other major organs. In severe cases heartworms can grow up to 12in long and .8in thick in populations of over 200. Overtime, and if not treated, heartworm disease can cause:

  • Damage to the lining of the artery leading from the heart to the lungs (pulmonary artery)
  • Clogging of the pulmonary artery
  • Heart valve malfunction
  • Heart enlargement and failure; causing death

How Do Dogs Get Heartworm?

The spread of heartworm begins when an infected dog is bitten by a mosquito, which then results in that mosquito being infected. When that infected mosquito bites another dog, the mosquito spreads the infection. In the newly infected dog, it will take between six and seven months for the infective larvae to mature to adult heartworms. The adult heartworms mate and the females release their offspring into the host’s bloodstream, completing the lifecycle. 

Heartworm disease is not contagious, meaning that a dog can’t catch the disease from being near an infected dog. Heartworm disease is only spread through the bite of a mosquito, which makes it difficult to monitor without an effective preventative treatment plan. 

Symptoms of Heartworm Disease

Often very subtle and tricky to detect, the initial symptoms of heartworm disease can be very mild. Early in the disease progression, there may not be any symptoms at all, which is part of what makes heartworm such a difficult disease to diagnose. As heartworm disease progresses from stage one through to stage four, treatment methods become increasingly more severe and invasive.

Stage One: No symptoms or mild symptoms such as an occasional cough.

Stage Two: Mild to moderate symptoms such as an occasional cough and tiredness after moderate activity.

Stage Three: General loss of body condition, a persistent cough, and tiredness after mild activity. Trouble breathing and signs of heart failure are common. For class 2 and 3 heartworm disease, heart and lung changes are usually seen on chest x-rays.

Stage Four: Also called ‘caval syndrome’. The severity of the worm burden will physically block blood flowing back to the heart, due to the large mass of worms. Caval syndrome is life-threatening and quick surgical removal of the heartworms is the only treatment option. The surgery is highly risky, and even with surgery, most pets with caval syndrome die.

Heartworm Prevention

The good news is that this detrimental disease can be easily prevented and there are a variety of treatment options available. However, it is very important to understand that preventive treatments will not kill adult heartworms. If a heartworm-positive dog is not tested before starting a preventive, the dog will remain infected with adult heartworms until it gets ill enough to show symptoms. Also, giving heartworm preventive to a dog that has an adult heartworm infection may be harmful or deadly. Annual testing of all dogs on heartworm prevention is recommended. Talk to your veterinarian about the best time for your dog’s annual heartworm test.


Once your pet is cleared of heartworm disease, there are a range of options to provide your pet with year round protection from this deadly disease. These include:

  • Heartgard Plus chews can be fed to your dog, once a month, year round
  • Tablets can also be taken monthly; Generic Heartgard or Valueheart
  • Alternatively, Revolution or Advocate external pipettes can be applied to the skin once a month. An added bonus in using these preventatives is they also treat fleas and various other intestinal worms.
  • More frequent preventative treatments like Dimmitrol tablets can be administered daily
Have you ever wondered why your cat chooses to run laps of the house at 3 A.M? Click here to read more.

Monday, February 1, 2016

Winter Joint Pain

During the cooler months does your dog prefer to curl up rather than play fetch? A sudden reduction in activity can trigger joint pain and joint problems in pets. It’s important as pet owners to monitor your fur friends and know how to spot the signs of joint pain. By following a few simple steps and becoming familiar with arthritic and joint pain warning signs, you can help put a stop to your pet’s aches and pains this winter.
  

What Causes Joint Problems in Pets?

Fun and games or fun and pain? Your dog’s joints can take a real pounding when chasing after that tennis ball or jumping off the back deck. For some dogs this can be a significant problem that may lead to joint-related problems such as ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) tears or even osteoarthritis. 
The two major categories of joint related problems are developmental and degenerative problems. In dogs, developmental problems affect the ongoing functional developmental milestones. This can be things such as hip or elbow dysplasia, where the joint does not develop correctly in a number of different aspects. Degenerative problems cover many areas, however the most common cause of arthritis in dogs is cruciate ligament problems. This is when the ligament degenerates over time and causes instability and secondary osteoarthritis.  

Symptoms

You may notice that your pet is doing less or perhaps showing difficulty when performing standard activities. You may also notice your pet now has a problem with getting up on the couch, or maybe going up the stairs. For others it may be that they can no longer play or go on walks as long as they use to. From here it can progress to overt lameness (holding the limb up or in an abnormal way). These are the most common symptoms your pets may show- rarely will you see overt pain as the first complaint.  

How Can You Help And Prevent Your Pet From Having Joint Problems?

Joint problems can’t be reversed once they have been attained, however there are ways to slow down the progression and possibility of greater problems. Here are five ways to help keep your pet’s joints healthy:

Start Early

Joint problems in most cases develop as a result of injury much earlier in life, even when your pet is a puppy or kitten. Excessive exercise, jumping too high, and running too hard before a puppy’s bones and joints are mature can injure the joints. Try ensuring that you monitor and set boundaries to your young pet’s exercise and play routines.

Make Environmental Accommodations

No matter what the age or size of your pup is they can still hurt themselves when jumping from high surfaces. Try making it easier for your dogs to do what they love without risking injury. For example, provide a dog ramp when getting out of the car, or offer them a footstool so they don’t have to risk the full distance of the leap (keeping in mind that they actually are willing to use these alternatives). 

Treat Injuries Promptly

As suggested by Veterinarians, it is vital to treat any suspected joint injury immediately to reduce and prevent the worsening of joint problems as your pet ages. This may involve forced rest, specific Dog Joint Supplements or Cat Joint Supplements or event surgical repair. 

Keep Pets Moving

Exercise feeds the joints by pumping natural lubrication into the areas being used. Gentle exercise keeps joints limber, and assists with keeping your pets fit and healthy. Joints can stiffen after naps, especially in the cooler months, so it can help to provide a heated bed or a gentle massage and stretch each morning to get your pet ready for the day ahead. Also noting in the cooler months to maintain and continue your usual walk routine, just don’t forget your jackets! 

Feed Appropriate Food

Overfeeding or providing your pet with a poor diet can lead to obesity. Excess weight adds strain on pet’s joints’, which results in greater energy needed as well as pain when performing standard movements. Choosing the correct diet or adding Joint-Supporting Dietary Supplements can slow down the progression or even prevent joint problems in your pets. 

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Monday, January 11, 2016

Get Free Shipping On Winter Health Care Essentials at CanadaVet

During the cooler months does your dog prefer to curl up rather than play fetch? A sudden reduction in activity can trigger joint pain and joint problems in pets. It’s important as pet owners to monitor your fur friends and know how to spot the signs of joint pain. This month only, get FREE SHIPPING on winter health care essentials at CanadaVet. Click here for details.



Friday, January 8, 2016

Three Simple Ways Apple Cider Vinegar Can Help Your Dog

For years people have used vinegar as a health treatment and household cleaning agent. But did you know it can be used to help our fur friends too! Keep reading to find out three simple ways apple cider vinegar can help your dog. 


Method One: Washing Your Dog With Apple Cider Vinegar

After bathing your dog, brush the vinegar through their coat. It will improve the shine of your dog’s coat, act as a deodorant and help prevent dry skin and itchiness. Please note, don’t use if your dog’s skin is dry, broken, or otherwise irritated. 

Method Two: Cleaning Your Dogs Ears With Apple Cider Vinegar

The antibacterial properties of apple cider vinegar make it ideal to clean out a dog’s ears. It will help prevent infection and ward off parasites that are susceptible to the acid in apple cider vinegar. Soak a cotton ball or piece of clean cloth in the vinegar and gently wipe your dog’s ears. 

Method Three: Treating Your Dog With Apple Cider Vinegar

Putting apple cider vinegar in your dog’s water twice a week will help to improve their general health. Apple cider vinegar helps to keep the skin and fur healthy as well as helps keep fleas away. To feed your dog apple cider vinegar, just add a teaspoon to their water dish twice a week.