Wednesday, January 29, 2014

Earthquake Preparation Tips for Your Pet

When you are located in an earthquake belt and have experienced a few earthquakes, it is important that your pet be identified properly. Keep in mind that this is important especially in a time of natural disasters such as earthquakes when pets can run away due to fright. Be sure that your pet has a tag and a collar. There are also other identification methods you might be interested in and even inside your house, it is recommended that your pet has an ID.

First Aid Kits

If you have a kit containing first aid supplies, check to see what might be available for pet treatment in case of injuries. You might want to find a reference guide for pets or ask your vet about what medication your pet will need for emergencies.  Remember that at the time of the earthquake or other natural disaster, your vet may not be available immediately so preparing in advance is essential.

Hiding

Pets tend to hide immediately when they are scared. Knowing where they go when they are afraid will help when an earthquake happens and you don’t know where they are. Have their favourite food or treat ready for coaxing them out. Trained dogs will usually follow your command, so training is something you might want to consider.

Medication

When your pet happens to need medication, ensure that you have an extra on hand supply that is ready to take as necessary. Blankets can also be useful for pet bedding if you are forced to relocate on an emergency.

Keep Calm

So pets won’t run away and bolt, keep pets calm. Keep harnesses and leashes handy. Owners of cats need to have a carrier ready-to-go just in case. Remember that the hard plastic, large types are more durable compared to the cardboard types. Also, the larger types made of durable plastic are also great for protecting your pet from debris that falls from structures that are damaged. Have canned or dry food ready along with bottled water. These should be ready in a bag that you can just grab on-the-go. If you happen to get the canned food that does not pop open, have a can opener ready. In your car and house, it is advisable for you to have a one-week supply.

Aftershocks


It is inevitable that an aftershock will occur, so keeping yourself calm at the time that these occur will help your calm remain calm as well. 

Mark Perry is a dedicated veterinarian for Canada Vet with over 20 years experience. A farm boy born and breed, Dr Perry loves all animals but he has a special place in his heart for working animals, particularly working dogs and horses.

Wednesday, January 22, 2014

4 Tips for Dealing with Loneliness in Your Pet Dog

If you have just one pet and tend to spend long hours working as you leave your pooch alone at home, he could be feeling lonely. For a lonely dog, he will greatly benefit by having extra company in general. You might even begin to see big improvements in his mood once he has a companion. Not to mention the fact that happy dogs tend to be happier. In the precious moments you do have for each other, you will love enjoying time with your pet when he is in a better mood.

A Sad Demeanour

Compared to the average dog, a pooch that needs company will seem sadder. He will have a sad demeanour to his walk and have markedly sad eyes. Compared to other dogs, he will not want to participate in nor enjoy outdoor, fun activities.

Regression and Disobedience

In some of his actions, a dog who happens to be lonely will tend to regress and disobedient. He may begin sneaking out of your yard and chewing on your belongings. He might even do his business inside the house, even after years of having been toiled trained. He may even disobey you purposely to get attention. No matter what, these acts can be signs that your dog craves a companion.

Less Activity

Dogs that are lonely will be less active and slower than happier dogs. He will sleep more, lie around more and go for walks or play with less frequency. The pastimes your dog used to love will be something he is not as interested in. Lonely dogs do not eat as much as happy dogs either. You will notice a change in his eating habits and he will tend to eat lighter meals. He won’t want to eat too much and when this happens with medical conditions ruled out, your dog may be suffering from loneliness.

Options to Consider


There are a few options to consider once you suspect your pooch is lonely. One option is to get another pet such as a cat, bird or another dog. While you are gone, other pets can keep your furry pal company. Hire a pet sitter or a dog walker to visit Fido routinely if another pet is out of the question. This will help get your lonely dog socialized. Check to see if your community has a doggie day care where he can socialize, play and run around. This can do wonders for alleviating your dog’s loneliness. 

Mark Perry is a dedicated veterinarian for Canada Vet with over 20 years experience. A farm boy born and breed, Dr Perry loves all animals but he has a special place in his heart for working animals, particularly working dogs and horses.

Wednesday, January 15, 2014

Aggression in Your Pet Dog

In dogs, aggression happens to be the most serious and common problem of behaviour. It is also one of the primary reasons that pet owners seek help professionally from veterinarians, trainers and behaviourists.

Aggressive Behaviour

Aggression can refer behaviour that happens in various circumstances for many different reasons. Mostly, animals in the wild tend to be aggressive when they guard their territory, protect themselves and defend their offspring. Groups of species that include dogs and people also utilize the threat of aggression and aggression to negotiate social interaction and keep the peace.

It can mean many things to say that a dog is aggressive. A range of behaviour is encompassed by the term, usually beginning with a warning that can end in attacks. At any point during an encounter of aggression, dogs may abort their effort. Dogs that display aggressive behaviour usually exhibit intense behaviour.  This behaviour can include shaking and biting, repeated, successive and rapid bites, puncture bites, snaps, snarls, showing teeth, growling, muzzle punches and mouthing as though to control or move the person. Behaviour can also include charging at the person with no contact, guttural barks that sound like threats and becoming very rigid and still.

Often, this behaviour is not done in sequence, but rather, simultaneously. Most time, pet owners do not even recognize the sign of warning before a bite occurs, and think of their pets as suddenly behaving erratically, which is really seldom the case. Before a bite and a warning, it can be merely milliseconds. However, it is a rare case when a dog suddenly bites with no previous warning.

Evaluation of Behaviour

In the past, if your pet has been aggressive and you have a suspicion that this could happen again, it is important that you take time to do a situation evaluation for what has caused your pooch to become upset. Where and when did this occur? What else was going on? What had just really happened r was about to occur? What ceased the aggression from continuing? Learning all you can about the situation can help make your dog’s aggressive behaviour clear. Plus, in the future, you will know what set of your pet and avoid the situation. Before you can get help, however, an accurate diagnosis is important. In dogs, behavioural, aggressive issues may vary as to the cause.


Even if a dog’s breed may play a part, it is neither wise nor accurate to make this the basis of aggression. The best prevention is to socialize your dog as a puppy. When you notice a sudden change in your pet’s behaviour, it is important to pay a visit to the veterinarian immediately.

Mark Perry is a dedicated veterinarian for Canada Vet with over 20 years experience. A farm boy born and breed, Dr Perry loves all animals but he has a special place in his heart for working animals, particularly working dogs and horses.

Wednesday, January 8, 2014

Moving To A New Apartment With Your Pet

Like human beings, most pet dogs or cats are not big fans of change. If they had a change, they would stay settled in where they are comfortable forever. On the other hand, at one point or another, it may be necessary to move them to a new location, such as an apartment. Making this move as stress-free as you can will have great benefits, including less hiding, anxious barking or meowing and making attempts to escape. Preparing for the big move with your pet months in advance will help you do a smooth transition for both you and your pet.

The New Apartment

It can be an exciting change for both your pets and yourself to move to a new apartment. On the other hand, just like the process can be stressful and overwhelming to you, it can feel this way to your pet as well. There are a few things you can do to make the move with your pet as simple and smooth as can be.

Away from Chaos

When the moving men have carried and arranged all the furniture into your new pad, you should not leave your pet in the midst of the chaotic activity. Rather, keep your pet safe and secure in an area that is truly quiet such as the bathroom or in a shaded part of the back yard when the day of moving has come around. On the door of the bathroom, you can hang a sign that says ‘do not disturb’ to increase your pet’s privacy even more.

A New Crate

Whether you are moving with your pet cat or dog, you will want to be sure to introduce your pet gradually to new crates a long time before the actual trip. By doing this, your pet will feel a lot more comfort on the day of the move. A long time before you actually get up and go, leave the carrier out a few weeks before your big move and encourage your pet dog or cat to explore and crawl in. You can even leave a dog treat or catnip inside to encourage your furry pal to get inside it. Make sure the crate is sturdy and well-ventilated especially if your puppy tends to ‘chew.’ When you make the move with a pet cat, you will want to include a small tray for litter in the crate. 

Mark Perry is a dedicated veterinarian for Canada Vet with over 20 years experience. A farm boy born and breed, Dr Perry loves all animals but he has a special place in his heart for working animals, particularly working dogs and horses.

Friday, January 3, 2014

A Pet Costume for Your Pooch

It is that time of year when pets and humans find favourite costumes for various parties. If your pet tends to resist dressing up, you might want to take it slow.  Your pet will need a bit of tender loving care with getting cozy with his brand new outfit and look picture perfect for the party!

A Puppy in Disguise

The fact is that no matter how important it is for your pet to get in costume, it is a good idea to introduce a new outfit slowly. This way, your pet will be acclimated to new clothing before the big bash. One week before your pet’s costume debut, it is a good idea to get him to sniff the costume and get used to the way it smells. Next, put this on your pet before praising and rewarding him with treats. Consider this the dress rehearsal of your pet.

Never Force

When it comes to wearing a costume, it is not a good idea to force your pet to do this. Use a voice that is soothing to get your pet dressed up. Some pets don’t like the process of under the belly or over the head. However, neither should be a giant struggle. If your pooch seems to hate your choice of costume and begins to fight back, don’t force the issue and try again another time.

Take it Off

If at any point during the party, your pet does not seem to be very comfortable, removing the costume would be a good idea. Lavish your pooch with special attention and praise to make him feel extra special. What out for clothes that do not get caught on items

Just For Fun


Once your pet decides it isn’t too uncomfortable to get into costume, you might find that you actually love dressing up your pet for holiday parties, Halloween or just for a fun time at the pet-friendly mall. Some owners of pets may have a big selection of costumes that can even be used for photographing scrapbooks and calendars. It is a good idea to be creative when it comes to pet clothing. To begin with, you might want to consider measuring your pet even before you purchase the costume to ensure that there won’t be any discomfort or tight-fighting, constricting clothes. You might even want to consider outfits of superheroes, aliens or movie characters you love.


Mark Perry is a dedicated veterinarian for Canada Vet with over 20 years experience. A farm boy born and breed, Dr Perry loves all animals but he has a special place in his heart for working animals, particularly working dogs and horses.